Matthew Klein's Food Photography Blog


September 26, 2011, 5:48 PM
Filed under: food | Tags: , , , , , ,

Meatless Monday Pollo Ciabatta (made with meatless chicken cutlet):

 



September 19, 2011, 6:40 PM
Filed under: food, food photography | Tags: , , , ,

Grilled Halibut with Watermelon Salsa, photographed for FRx, the womens’ fitness magazine:



September 13, 2011, 6:16 PM
Filed under: food, food photography | Tags: , , ,

Just a great burger:



Food Photography Blog #5

Food photography for packaging.
I learned long ago that over 90% of brand decisions are made at the point of purchase.
This is an astounding fact,
the conclusion of which is that packaging design is the most efficient place to put marketing and advertising dollars.
Remember: At scale, good design adds very little to a national brand’s production costs.

-MK

LU Cookies & Biscuits packaging photographed for Kraft Foods:



Food Photography Blog #4

A word about selective focus: SELECTIVE.
The whole purpose of this too often mis-used technique
is to isolate the eye on a particular area of the photograph.
It has other uses as well, but they are less important.
It is also a method of ‘deconstructing’ the image,
as though saying  that the photograph is natural, unaffected,
not created with the great skill of a ‘professional.’
The point of this is that the food looks great and is appetizing,
without any affectation or modification.
But the point is lost it the focus isn’t carefully placed.

-MK

Taco photographed for McCormick Spices/Landor Associates



Food Photography Blog #1

Welcome to my blog about food photography.
Let’s start with a couple of general notions.
In my view, a photograph of food,
especially if it is made for commercial purposes,
ought to make you hungry. That is its purpose,
whether it is to persuade you to buy a specific product or select a brand.
This can be very different from editorial photography,
in which the purpose might be voyeuristic,
that is, to show an aspirational life-style,
or to provide recipe information.

Think of a photograph of a pie.
In a magazine the subject is the pie,
usually supported by props indicating a particular life-style,
or socio-economic level.
In an advertising photograph the subject, for example,
might be the flakey-ness of the crust,
made so by the client’s product, (in this case) Crisco.
The subject is flakiness, not pie.
In fact you might say that the pie is a prop for the flakiness.

-MK